Scarf II: the sequel

Here’s what I did with my hands during Vericon.

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I’m afraid you can’t see it very well, due to lack of an actual camera. It’s about 47 inches long and made of handspun purple and gray heathered wool (the pinkish purple yarn from my last post, in fact). The center design is a five-stranded braid made by alternating crossing the first and third strands on the left rightward below the second and fourth, and crossing the second and fourth rightward above the third and fifth. Hence the pattern repeat is much less complicated than it looks. The outer edges have a simple cable in three stitches. The scarf was quite quick to make, because the yarn is comparatively thick (about bulky weight, although of course not precisely so). The original pattern came from http://www.mimknits.com/downloads/cablescarf.pdf. As before, it doesn’t belong to me, posting my results here is not for any commercial use, etc, and many thanks to its author.  Here’s a closer look.

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Now, off to ship it to my aunt. The esteemed esqg and I will be posting about the embroidery project soon! We promise!

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Scarf!

This summer my sister brought me a large skein of wool from the Aran Islands, and as I was much in need of a scarf, I decided that the sensible course was to cable the living daylights out of it. Here’s the result, which I finished in late December.scarf2

It was knit on size eight needles and a single double pointed needle for the cabling. The wool is approximately sport weight and slightly heathered; I estimate there were roughly seven hundred yards thereof.  It still smelled quite strongly and pleasingly of lanolin when I began to work with it. The pattern can be found here: http://smariek.blogspot.com/2008/08/triumph-cable-scarf-pattern.html. (Note that this pattern is copyrighted to its originator. I am very grateful to him or her for posting it so that others could use it, and am only posting my results with it here so that my friends can see.) The completed scarf is quite thick and measures 52 inches by 7 inches. Each pattern repeat is about 3 inches long. Here is a closer look at the pattern.scarf4

As you can see, there are ten strands to the design; the six middle strands work their way once across the diagram in the course of two pattern repeats. The temporarily outermost strands of the six also twist around themselves. The scarf is knit such that all cables are worked on the even-numbered rows of the sixteen-row pattern; the odd numbered rows are simply knit or purled as appropriate. At the start, a pattern repeat took about two hours to complete, but familiarity with the design allowed me to whittle that down to ninety minutes by the end of the scarf.

And now onward to the next project…

Potholder

I have now crocheted two versions of a Potholder Stitch Oven Mitt: one for me and my roommates, one for my father.  The website with the instructions seems to have been shut down!  So, the way I do it is with Sugar&Cream cotton yarn, because it’s good for high temperatures and it’s variegated.  I use a size G hook, but another size would be okay.

The tricky thing is how to do a potholder stitch.  You start with an ordinary chain for row 0; then, for the first row, you single-crochet only in the back loop of that row, leaving the front loops.  At the end of the row chain and turn, and then single-crochet through the back loop of the first row and the remaining (front) loops of row 0.  You’ve left the front loops of the first row alone, so for row 3 you use those loops along with the back loops of row 2.  The overall effect is a kind of crocheting that is twice as thick and the stitches on a given side all face the same direction.

Instructions:

0: Chain 21 stitches.  Turn. 
1: Sc (single-crochet) into back loop only of row 0, 19 stitches.  Chain 1.  Turn.
2: Sc (single-crochet) into back loop of row 1 together with front loop of row 0, 19 stitches.  Chain 1.  Turn.
3-30: Continue, until you have 15 rows visible on each side.

Thumb: Do only 5 stitches for row 31; chain 1, turn.  Continue for a total of 10 5-stitch rows.  Then to neaten up the top, pull a loop through *both* loops of the first stitch of row 40 and the back loop of the last of row 39; pull another loop as usual for the second stitch; yarn over and pull through all three loops.  So, in other words, crochet the first two stitches together but use up the front loop too for the first stitch because you won’t need it.  Do the next stitch as usual; then for the third, crochet the last two together, using up the front loop of the last.  Chain 1, turn.  Crochet the first two stitches together as before, and do the third one single-crochet through all three loops.  Knot the yarn, cut it.

Fingers: Go back to the other 14 stitches, and do as the thumb was.  I do it for 14 full stitches, making the thumb stick out slightly.  The original instructions have it just for 13, so the thumb can go straight up.  Anyway, do 20 rows for this (10 on each side) then decrease each row at beginning and end, so by 2 stitches and using up the extra loops, 3-4 times or until satisfied with the shape.  Finish.

Finally, you go and make another one, and sew them together on the edges except at the bottom.  I ended up crocheting them together along the edges and then turning it out, but that may not be the best way to do it.

Here’s a picture of the first one I did:

Welcome to the HRSFANS crafts blog

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